Two! But which owl is the original?

Wilder Man on Rolling Creek:

I’ve followed the Being Bodeker blog for a while. Nothing like it. She appears to know a whole heck of a lot about birds. Her images are magnificent … like what you would find here in this blog about an owl.

Originally posted on Being Bodeker:

IMG_5126[1] Coralee, there’s TWO!!!!

Several hours after posting yesterday about the red morph Eastern Screech-owl the kids found in a dead tree’s cavity above our creek, Brian & Merritt found the owl again using binoculars in the yard, but s/he now had a mate! Another red-morph ESO!

Two red morph Eastern Screech-owls; Benton County; top right owl appears larger, so female?  Male on bottom left? Two red morph Eastern Screech-owls; Benton County; top right owl appears larger, so female? Male on bottom left?

IMG_5127[1] Top right owl.

 They were dozing.  Opening one eye every now & then.  Roosting in a cedar/juniper tree just a few steps up-creek from the cavity.

IMG_5090[1]

IMG_5106[1]

IMG_5125[1] Top right owl, probably the female…which makes me think she is new. IMG_5049[2] So who am I? This is the original owl we saw…do you think this is the owl in the top right or the bottom left? The bottom left owl is smaller & males are smaller. IMG_5124[2] Click to enlarge. Bottom left owl appears both smaller & a darker shade…

View original 92 more words

Child of the Wind

From Bruce Cockburn (long “o”, silent “c” and “k”).  Lyrics from “Child of the Wind”.  Cockburn’s lyrics (some of them) are so wonderful.  Some of you may be familiar with a tune entitled “Wondering Where The Lions Are”.  That is a Cockburn tune.  Here are some selected lines from “Child of the Wind”.  Hearing him sing it is worth your time:

  https://www.youtube.com/watch?      v=g_SL4QK6VVY

http://revkevinrogers.blogspot.com/2012_01_01_archive.html

http://revkevinrogers.blogspot.com/ 2012_01_01_archive.html

Child of the Wind I love the pounding of hooves / I love engines that roar / I love the wild music of waves on the shore

http://entertainmenttoday.net /dvd/16391/2014/05/ bruce-cockburn-pacing-the-cage/

I love the wild music of waves on the shore / And the spiral perfection of a hawk when it soars / Love my sweet woman down to the core There’s roads and there’s roads / And they call, can’t you hear it? / Roads of the earth / And roads of the spirit 

The best roads of all / Are the ones that aren’t certain / One of those is where you’ll find me / Till they drop the big curtain

Hear the wind moan In the bright diamond sky These mountains are waiting Brown-green and dry I’m too old for the term But I’ll use it anyway I’ll be a child of the wind Till the end of my days

Little round planet In a big universe Sometimes it looks blessed Sometimes it looks cursed Depends on what you look at obviously But even more it depends on the way that you see

Hear the wind moan In the bright diamond sky These mountains are waiting Brown-green and dry I’m too old for the term But I’ll use it anyway I’ll be a child of the wind Till the end of my days

Working with Indigenous Australians…

Wilder Man on Rolling Creek:

Wow. I mad sure that Baz doesn’t mind my re-blogging some of his posts. You’ve see some of his posts before. This wild. It fits with this blog, Wilder Man on Rolling Creek.

Originally posted on Baz - The Landy (Out and About having fun):

Anne Beadell Highway

The opportunity to visit an extremely remote and arid part of Australia came my way the other day, an opportunity to spend time in country with a group of traditional landowners and aboriginal elders deep in the desert region of Western Australia.

“The Landy” will be pointed westward travelling deep into the desert region, crossing sand dunes and making tracks as our small convoy travels deep into the desert.

We will make tracks where no other European Australian’s have previously been as much of this trip will be completely across country, no roads or tracks to follow.

They say one door closes and another opens and crikey, isn’t that the truth!

Recently I wrote a piece on “Fate, are you a Believer” after forgoing a trip to climb a 6,500-metre peak in Nepal, but missing the terrible natural disaster that devastated the country following last week’s earthquake; a…

View original 256 more words

Striking skies over Syracuse

Wilder Man on Rolling Creek:

Mark’s blog. Enjoy the images & the good post.

Originally posted on Mark Bialczak:

As Ellie B aka Dogamous Pyle and I worked our way back toward the Little Bitty in the Syracuse city neighborhood of Eastwood this half-and-half spring Sunday afternoon, we couldn’t help but note the sky above.

Part gray, part blue. Part gray, part blue.

April prepares to give itself up to May, and the see and the saw of this dance was somewhere in the middle of the fulcrum today. Temperature, 50s F. Grass, greening. Trees, some budding, others bare. Sky, blue and gray in some portions, gray and blue on others.

Enjoy the angles in this gallery surrounding our blue house. We certainly did.

Click on a photo for a description. Click on the bottom right photo for an enlarged slide show.

Is it totally one way or another where you live today, or a half-and-half day? Are you seeing more spring or more summer of late? Which photo is your favorite, and…

View original 1 more word

Vikings … On My Mind

Vikings, on my mind, recently.

Germanic Norse seafarers.  Raiders and traders.  Radical warriors who hung out across the northern and the central parts of Europe, and parts of Russia.  Vikings ventured into the Mediterranean, and North Africa; the Middle East; Central Asia.  All of this happening in the latter 8th  century, extending  into the late 11th century.

Vikings were romanticized, mythologized, as noble savages … this spotlight of intrigue began in the 18th century; gained serious momentum during the 19th-century.  “Vikings, from historical theories, were at times quite violent, piratical heathens,  or as intrepid adventurers owe much to conflicting varieties of the modern Viking myth that had taken shape by the early 20th century.” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vikings

So . . . 

Why the sudden interest  in the Vikings, emerging now … in the midst of a fairly peaceful transition from winter to spring?  Well, it’s like this.  When I went to high school, a few years ago, we had a mascot; and this is not uncommon.  Our mascot was, or were (to be more specific) the Vikings.  Someone drew an awesome picture of a Viking, before I came to be a high school student.  Although, there is much talk that Vikings did not really have helmets with horn.  But don’t despair, Viking fans: none of us really know, because … none of us were there.  But even though “we” were … and still are … the Vikings, why am I thinking of the Vikings right now?  Here is the answer.  I received a mysterious note from a guy I went to high school with, that there was some serious talk of a reunion coming up … as soon as October of this year.  This would be out of state for me.  In fact, I rarely get down there anymore, which is unquestionably a tragedy.  Now the matter has become less convoluted, yes?  It makes sense why Vikings are on my mind.  There is so much research done about different people groups from different eras, different regions.  I will always be skeptical when historians say Vikings were ” … at times quite violent, piratical heathens,  or as intrepid adventurers …”  I have no doubt that these guys lived in perilous times.  There were probably times when some mean people were coming this way, and it was a choice of either living or dying … and to live meant fighting.  Who knows what these guys were up against.  And maybe there was a wildman who figured out how to get a helmet, and attach some horns … and then he wore that wherever he went … especially at parties, and when he was riding in one of the longboats.  

In one source, http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/a-viking-mystery-59648019/?no-ist, it was established that the Vikings were traders first … and when   economic times became bleak, they had give up trading … in the conventional sense.  

That is when they began going into different lands … And, yeah, things got a bit disruptive.  Well, I know this.  The folks I went to high school with were goodhearted people who were ready to fight for what was right, and they lived with zeal and vision.  The only complaint I have is that none of us ever received our helmets with the horns on the side.  Bummer.

 

 

Arroyo

From the heart and mind of the wilderman, the wilderman who frequents Rolling Creek Trail, a trail that allows a wilderness sojourner to hike beside Rolling Creek in Pike National Forest, somewhere southwest of Denver, CO … yes, from weathered heart and weathered mind of this wilderman, comes another daring effort to bring you into a little different place, from your place of today-and-tomorrow.  Ideally, this ongoing agenda has a positive outcome.

Today, I bring the Ozark Mountain Daredevils to the stage.  I do actually find a peaceful pleasure in hearing some of their music from time to time, having listened to the Ozark Mountain Daredevils for several decades.  Years ago I headed online and sent an EMAIL to the Ozark Mountain Daredevils, curious about the song “Arroyo”, and whether or not there was a story, there, connected to the song.  The musician who wrote Arroyo explained that the song was about his earlier years when he was doing foolish things and getting in trouble.    For me the song exudes a theme of life experience, specifically difficult experiences.  At the beginning of the song, one of the guys is speaking an odd combination of words; perhaps some of them are code, and some of them are expressions.  Then these guys wrap up the song in a similar fashion; words spoken that sound like a mixture of nonsense and someone’s ramble focused on being deep and profound.  Regardless, this is one of my favorite songs because it is so strange; something resonates.   So, from the band, Ozark Mountain Daredevils, the album “Men From Earth”, here are the lyrics to “Arroyo” / https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CgIMeMiJK1g.  I hope you will take time to listen to Arroyo by going to the link.

(words spoken at the beginning of the song)
…city street
hang out
thumbs in pocket
black jacket
black jack
dego-red
Manhattenized-Bohemia
of Southern California,
tough punk of
cool, futuristic Montana…

Ozark Mountain Daredevils band / http://www.ozarkdaredevilstabs.com/(sung)

(sung) well, have you ever been mixed up /
feel like you’re in a stick-up, a hold-up,
a robbery in progress? /
well, I have

well, have you ever been faked out /
feel like you’re in a stake-out,
a cook-out, barbecued chicken? /
well, I have

(chorus)

come on, mama, get on the yo-yo

we’re all givin up down in the arroyo

have you ever been stranded
feel like you never landed,
a bandit, a merchant of Venice?
well, I have
well, have you even been tumbled
feel like you’re in a jungle,
a jungle, a town in New Jersey?
well, I have

(chorus)

come on, mama, get on the yo-yo

we’re all givin up down in the arroyo

(SAX SOLO)

well have you ever been hungry
feel like you’re gettin’ ugly
ornery, and everybody’s greasy?
well, I have
well have you ever been zooey
feel like you’re David Bowie,
a truly unidentified person?
well, I have

come on, mama, get on the yo-yo

we’re all givin up down in the arroyo

(spoken)
…there is a possibility of …
something running parallel…
what something is, it might be called
something other than what could be the same thing,
but uh, what could be the right thing
in other words, it might be a contigent-pository,
if what you are doing at the same time
that you are doing something else…

… let’s take, for example, if you were born on LakeMichigan…

 

I will always appreciate the power of story, and respect the sacred substance of an individual’s story.  I am thankful to hear about journeys.  “Arroyo” strikes me as a story within a song, a sacred story, about some of the anguish that happened in one’s life … while at the same time these guys add some kind of humor to the piece.

Vagabonds, Scoundrels and Highway Robbery

Wilder Man on Rolling Creek:

The Aussie, again. Power of story and history, here. Enjoy.

Originally posted on Baz - The Landy (Out and About having fun):

Targo

 Vagabonds, Scoundrels and Highway Robbery, along with the shout “Stand and Deliver” would send a shiver down the spine of many in days past as bushrangers were an integral part of the Australian landscape.

Recently, we had the occasion to travel into the beautiful Southern Highlands region of New South Wales. Our destination was Tarago, a small town located on the eastern side of Lake George which has a couple of historic buildings in its midst, including a quaint Anglican Church and at its epicentre, the “Loaded Dog Hotel”.

Nearby is the Woodlawn Mine, which produced gold, copper and zinc up until 1998, providing employment opportunities to the local community.  Today, the site hosts a “Bio-reactor”  which converts waste product, transported by rail from Sydney, to methane gas.  And given its proximity to the political capital of Australia and its resident population of politicians,  the hot air produced may very…

View original 276 more words