Wilder Man’s Glimpse of Alaska

I don’t take the time for such a glimpse, but I found one today. Today’s glimpse? Alaska.  Well worth the time.  If you want to catch the piece that captured my wildness the most, skip forward to 5:33 … and go to 7:58.  By all means, the entire 10:40 video is good.  But part of my vision for this blog is to respect people’s time, as much as possible.

Safety Tip:  the music used in the background triggers something in … in the realm of melancholy.  It’s not that bad anymore.  I just wanted to give you little heads-up in case you’ve experienced a similar reaction.  The guy’s name is Cory Williams, and he has a channel on YouTube called:

DudeLikeHella 

One more thing about Cory Williams.  He moved to Alaska in 2014 (July?) to live in Eagle River, Alaska … quite recently. Approximately a month later, he bought a house. About four months later, he became engage.

Cory Williams records video of himself as he does a flip in the snow at Kincaid Park on Tuesday, Oct. 21. Cory Williams, a video blogger and YouTube personality who posts as Mr. Safety and DudeLikeHELLA, recently moved to Eagle River.Marc Lester / ADN  (Alaska Dispatch News)

In May of this year, Williams married a woman named Kristen Swift.  Talking about some serious change, recently, in a short amount of time!!  This guy is on the move.  I would consider him a true Wilder Man.  But, he may not agree.  This video clip is really cool.  Enjoy.  Here’s the clip, a stellar Wilder Man’s glimpse into Alaska.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9aqsvzhK648

 

Child of the Wind

From Bruce Cockburn (long “o”, silent “c” and “k”).  Lyrics from “Child of the Wind”.  Cockburn’s lyrics (some of them) are so wonderful.  Some of you may be familiar with a tune entitled “Wondering Where The Lions Are”.  That is a Cockburn tune.  Here are some selected lines from “Child of the Wind”.  Hearing him sing it is worth your time:

  https://www.youtube.com/watch?      v=g_SL4QK6VVY

http://revkevinrogers.blogspot.com/2012_01_01_archive.html
http://revkevinrogers.blogspot.com/ 2012_01_01_archive.html

Child of the Wind I love the pounding of hooves / I love engines that roar / I love the wild music of waves on the shore

http://entertainmenttoday.net /dvd/16391/2014/05/ bruce-cockburn-pacing-the-cage/

I love the wild music of waves on the shore / And the spiral perfection of a hawk when it soars / Love my sweet woman down to the core There’s roads and there’s roads / And they call, can’t you hear it? / Roads of the earth / And roads of the spirit 

http://www.landscapehdwalls.com/rural-road-587/
http://www.landscapehdwalls.com /rural-road-587/

The best roads of all / Are the ones that aren’t certain / One of those is where you’ll find me / Till they drop the big curtain

Hear the wind moan In the bright diamond sky These mountains are waiting Brown-green and dry I’m too old for the term But I’ll use it anyway I’ll be a child of the wind Till the end of my days

http://donaldsdish.ca/2014/02/17/bruce-cockburn-experiencing-the-world-through-bruce-cockborns-iris/

Little round planet In a big universe Sometimes it looks blessed Sometimes it looks cursed Depends on what you look at obviously But even more it depends on the way that you see

Hear the wind moan In the bright diamond sky These mountains are waiting Brown-green and dry I’m too old for the term But I’ll use it anyway I’ll be a child of the wind Till the end of my days

Vikings … On My Mind

Vikings, on my mind, recently.

Germanic Norse seafarers.  Raiders and traders.  Radical warriors who hung out across the northern and the central parts of Europe, and parts of Russia.  Vikings ventured into the Mediterranean, and North Africa; the Middle East; Central Asia.  All of this happening in the latter 8th  century, extending  into the late 11th century.

http://www.wallpapervortex.com/tag-vikings.htm

Vikings were romanticized, mythologized, as noble savages … this spotlight of intrigue began in the 18th century; gained serious momentum during the 19th-century.  “Vikings, from historical theories, were at times quite violent, piratical heathens,  or as intrepid adventurers owe much to conflicting varieties of the modern Viking myth that had taken shape by the early 20th century.” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vikings

So . . . 

Why the sudden interest  in the Vikings, emerging now … in the midst of a fairly peaceful transition from winter to spring?  Well, it’s like this.  When I went to high school, a few years ago, we had a mascot; and this is not uncommon.  Our mascot was, or were (to be more specific) the Vikings.  Someone drew an awesome picture of a Viking, before I came to be a high school student.  Although, there is much talk that Vikings did not really have helmets with horn.  But don’t despair, Viking fans: none of us really know, because … none of us were there.  But even though “we” were … and still are … the Vikings, why am I thinking of the Vikings right now?  Here is the answer.  I received a mysterious note from a guy I went to high school with, that there was some serious talk of a reunion coming up … as soon as October of this year.  This would be out of state for me.  In fact, I rarely get down there anymore, which is unquestionably a tragedy.  Now the matter has become less convoluted, yes?  It makes sense why Vikings are on my mind.  There is so much research done about different people groups from different eras, different regions.  I will always be skeptical when historians say Vikings were ” … at times quite violent, piratical heathens,  or as intrepid adventurers …”  I have no doubt that these guys lived in perilous times.  There were probably times when some mean people were coming this way, and it was a choice of either living or dying … and to live meant fighting.  Who knows what these guys were up against.  And maybe there was a wildman who figured out how to get a helmet, and attach some horns … and then he wore that wherever he went … especially at parties, and when he was riding in one of the longboats.  

In one source, http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/a-viking-mystery-59648019/?no-ist, it was established that the Vikings were traders first … and when   economic times became bleak, they had give up trading … in the conventional sense.  

That is when they began going into different lands … And, yeah, things got a bit disruptive.  Well, I know this.  The folks I went to high school with were goodhearted people who were ready to fight for what was right, and they lived with zeal and vision.  The only complaint I have is that none of us ever received our helmets with the horns on the side.  Bummer.

http://www.bownet.org/vikingsexploration/FamousViking%20Explorers.htm

 

 

“Sleeping on the Summits”: 2 Wilder Men

Two guys: Jon Kedrowski and Christ Tomer discovered an unprecedented desire to climb to the summits of 58 fourteeners throughout Colorado.  Take that one step further: the goal was to”bivy” at the top: otherwise known as pitching a tent overnight.  “Bivy” is the abbreviated term for the word “bivouac”; a French term that gained exposure from French mountain climbers.  And this French word “bivouac”, according to the authors of Sleeping on the Summits: Colorado Fourteener High Bivys, refers to “a long night of suffering”.

http://ruinyourknees.com/reviews/sleeping-summits-colorado-bivys-book-review/

 

http://www.jonkeverest.org/

These mountaineers would start their climbs in the afternoon, and catch the sun setting in the west, then watch the same sun come up in the east.  The goal of Jon Kedrowski was to climb all 58 of the mountains that are fourteen thousand feet or higher.  Tomer was not able to make all of these ascents, but he came along whenever it worked out.  

 

Check out this 1:39 video featuring these two wilder men.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iy5H2TvHCo0

 This is an amazing book, with incredible images of the mountains in Colorado.

Here is a link to find out more about the book: 

http://www.amazon.com/Sleeping-Summits-Jon-Kedrowski/dp/1565796527

http://inclined.americanalpineclub.org/2012/01/climbing-high-setting-goals-and-getting-involved-with-the-aac/

Wilder Man Dad: Thankfulness?

RECENTLY …

I listened to Harry Chapin’s song, “Cat’s In The Cradle”.  Man-O-Man!  What a song!  I remember my dad and I in the car; me – – – just out of high school, and “Cat’s In The Cradle” came on the radio.  Dad’s face pensive as we listened to the words.  After the song, his eyes straight ahead, peering through the windshield as if it was a dark fog, he commented about the father not making time for his son while time passed by, opportunities lost.  My guess is that my dad was thinking about his father: the small amount of time he had with his father.

“My child arrived just the other day
He came to the world in the usual way
But there were planes to catch and bills to pay
He learned to walk while I was away
And he was talkin’ ‘fore I knew it, and as he grew
He’d say ‘I’m gonna be like you, Dad
You know I’m gonna be like you’ …”

I wanted to throw out this “thing” to my fellow wilder men, and the women curious about wilder men, who love wilder men … this “thing” about being a dad, having a son, living with the tension – – –  spending time with and giving our hearts to our sons, our daughters, in a robust way, knowing that this is the time where we pour into the lives of those wonderful kiddos who we are parenting, thanks to the gifting from the God who provides, the God who loves, the God who leads.  And courage calls.  I am a wilder man who  n e e d s   courage to be a good dad, who cannot afford to flounder, and say some nonsense like “Woe is me!  I need courage to be a good dad!  How can I get courage?”

“Well, he came from college just the other day
So much like a man I just had to say
‘Son, I’m proud of you, can you sit for a while?’
He shook his head and said with a smile
‘What I’d really like, Dad, is to borrow the car keys
See you later, can I have them please?’ ….”

If I whine about ‘needing courage’, I am missing the boat, I am missing my son, I am missing my daughter.  It is not about “needing courage”.  It is about taking courage, embracing courage, using courage not unlike one handles a sword.  I know we can learn from others; we can learn from what others have to say.

“And as I hung up the phone it occurred to me / He’d grown up just like me / My boy was just like me

And the cat’s in the cradle and the silver spoon      Little boy blue and the man in the moon

‘When you comin’ home son?’ / ‘I don’t know when, but we’ll get together then, Dad / 
We’re gonna have a good time then’ … ” 

And we can make a promise that we are not going to blow it … knowing that there is a possibility we can miss our children, knowing that we can sacrifice the fatherhood love for things that are not worth the sacrifice

Instead, we can know that we made a good, noble, courageous, other-centered choice, to love our sons and our daughters.  And we can know that we were intentional about spending priceless time with them, during their journey.

 

 

 

Sleepy Man Banjo Boys, Again … 3:30

I stumbled on to this little clip from the Sleepy Man Banjo Boys, and I almost like this one better than the first clip I brought on the Wilder Man On Rolling Creek blog … but, you really cannot compare the two pieces.  If you check this one out, try to catch the eyes and the facial expression of Jonny, the banjo player.  The boy is full of joy and mischief, eyes shining like a bright light in a dark night.  It makes me smile.  The enthusiasm of a young person … let us not dampen such a powerful, redemptive spirit.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RFbWkL818XQ

Jonny Mizzone: smiling with a banjo / video.news.com.au

SkunkORama !!! Dog’s Curious, Not Smart

Nocturnal Bark

… has been rare this summer, not only amongst my two dogs, but from other dogs in our woods.  The bigger, more profound, exception (with the nocturnal bark) would be when the bear comes near.  Our dogs have a distinct “bear howl-and-bark” when a bear gets close.  And the other dogs would be in league with ours, a passionate vigilant howling flying out of their bark-boxes through the rocks and trees.

Last night, I heard the Nocturnal Bark, somewhere between 5 and 5:30am. Stash was the only one barking.  I was holding out for the possibility that the barking would stop.  I was not meant to be so fortunate, it appears.  I went outside to the deck, over the garage.  It took a couple of seconds … only a couple of seconds … to recognize one of the most disgusting scents I’ve ever encountered: the spray from a skunk.  You can imagine my first thought.

 

 Mephitidae

Scientific name for the Skunk, which also means
“Stench”

 

I stood on the deck, calling our dog, Stash (Stosh – – – with a short “o”).  I could hear her, but could not see her, in the darkened woods.  I was dreading the possibility that Stash’s focus was on a skunk, and she had no intent of leaving her post to come in.  Shortly after my calling began,  I heard Stash emit what sounded like a playful growl … All I could do is roll my eyes.  I thought to myself:  “She is either getting ready to get sprayed, or … she has already been sprayed, and she thinks that this skunk is playing with her.”  I kept calling, and she kept refusing to come in.  So, I came back in a half-hour, and resumed my calling.  Finally, I heard her rustling / thrashing through the trees, making her way toward me.  She climbed up the steps, through the gate, with the appearance that she had enjoyed playing with someone new in the forest.  I didn’t want to smell the air around her, to determine if she had been successfully targeted by SkunkORama.  I got the gate closed so that she couldn’t go back out to the woods.  This morning, I walked out, cautiously took a whiff, and, to my disappointment, I knew beyond a shadow of a doubt that my dog had been skunked.  I know that one of the next things that needs to happen is that I have got get Stash into counseling, so she can push through these issues of acting like an idiot.  Anyone have a referral for a dog counselor?

By the way, here is a picture of our dog, resting.

Dog Stash
Stash Dog, resting, when not upsetting skunks.